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GEM e4

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GEM e4 - information: GEM e4 is a very good car, that was released by "GEM" company. We collected the best 11 photos of GEM e4 on this page.

Brand Name GEM
Model GEM e4
Number of views 105772 views
Model's Rate 7.2 out of 10
Number of images 11 images
Interesting News
  • The science and silence of AMG.

    AMG chairman Tobias Moers has revealed to Wheels that AMG is shifting its focus away from power and on to sharper dynamics for its future models. This means the introduction of high-tech systems such as active aerodynamics, four-wheel steering and even a Drift Mode function as AMG moves into a new battleground in the war for performance car ascendency. AMG has long held a power advantage over its rivals at BMW’s M Division and Audi RS, and Moers says the focus is now on finessing how that prodigious grunt is sent to the road. “It’s not my target to be the most powerful car,” he said. “The target is to be the best driving car. The next step is to be more active, with more active systems like active aero, and to be more active with kinematics.” Moers revealed AMG is well advanced in developing a range of active systems, most of which will debut on the much-hyped road-legal version of the AMG GT3 racing car due later this year. Expected to be badged as the GT R, Moers says the Porsche 911 GT3 rival “will signal the next step for AMG.” It’s also likely to be the first AMG to utilise four-wheel steering. “We discussed active technology earlier, and this will be one of those systems,” Moers told us. “It will help to increase high-speed stability, yaw damping at high speed, and you can increase agility in the car as well. It’s good technology.” The GT R, which is in the final stages of development, takes heavy inspiration from the GT3 racer (pictured) and will include a more aggressive, track-inspired body kit, dominated by a larger rear spoiler and front splitter. Moers hinted this makes the GT R the ideal model to debut active aerodynamic components to improve dynamics. The GT R will also be lighter than the 1570kg AMG GT S, boast wider tracks front and rear, and could produce as much as 415kW from its 4.0-litre twin-turbo V8. Moers wouldn’t be drawn on the GT R’s potential power output, but did say “we have plenty of room to grow [with the 4.0-litre engine].” Currently the 4.0-litre V8 produces 375kW/750Nm in the AMG GT S. Future models will see AMG step even further along the hightech route. Moers revealed he sees a future where AMG models are powered purely by electricity and confirmed his engineers are already developing electric drivetrains that could manifest in a number of different forms. “Electrification makes more sense to me than performance diesels,” he said. “We are looking at everything from plug-in hybrids to pure electric and electric turbos because we are not in position to exclude something from our portfolio. So we’ll do work on several programs at once to find our own path on electrification for the future.” But while Moers sees electrification as inevitable, he’s quick to assure AMG fans that future electric models will retain the brand’s character. “Sound is crucial to AMG, so we will find a solution,” he said. “We found one with the SLS Electric Drive and we know it’s important.” The 552kW SLS AMG Electric Drive, which in 2013 claimed the title as the world’s quickest production electric car with a 0-100km/h sprint of 3.9sec, pumped artificial noise into the cabin during acceleration via its audio system. What’s unlikely to have a long future is AMG’s mighty 12-cylinder engine. Moers confirmed that AMG’s iconic 6.0-litre twin-turbo V12 is under threat due to evertightening emission laws. “We do have V12 aficionados worldwide who want us to keep it, but the V12 segment no longer represents AMG as a brand. There are customers that are very interested in that engine in that exclusive segment, so we are responsible for engineering a V12 and it’s up to us to give the V12 a future. But that’s not decided.” Moers said recent changes to China’s emissions rules have placed the V12’s future in jeopardy. “That’s giving us a big headache with the V12, so it’s a question of how we proceed. That’s what we’re discussing in the company now.”
  • Suzuki SX4 S-Cross 1.6 DDiS Automatic.

    Suzuki’s SX4 S-Cross has been around for a couple of years and has earned a quiet following for blending a practical interior with a certain amount of driving flair, all at a reasonable price. What it’s never had, and no Suzuki for the last 22 years has had, is an automatic gearbox allied with a diesel engine, or at least a proper one rather than a continuously variable transmission. This combination accounts for 16 per cent of sales in the compact SUV market, so Suzuki is keen to tap in to that extra revenue stream by launching an automatic gearbox option for the existing diesel engine. The gearbox uses a twin-clutch setup to engage odd or even gears in advance, depending on whether the driver is accelerating or braking, ensuring a smooth and instantaneous shift of the next required gear. In use it operates exactly as you would expect an automatic gearbox to work, although it’s technically an automated manual system - hydraulics control the clutch and gearshift in the background, leaving you with nothing to do but play with the steering wheel mounted paddles, should you wish to take over control yourself. Systems of this nature are often a tad rough, but Suzuki’s version is remarkably smooth. Each gear is selected without fuss, and there’s no clunking through the system as the clutch is engaged. It’s not notably quick, despite the claims of instant shifting, but the short pause between ratios would only be a problem if this SUV was a more sporting proposition. Not that the S-Cross can’t handle bends. It can, and probably better than you have any right to expect, but it’s never particularly involving or rewarding. Allgrip four-wheel-drive is standard on this edition, with the electronic gadgetry splitting the power between each wheel, and allowing you to get further in tricky conditions than a conventional two-wheel-drive SUV will allow you. Driving to the top of Ben Nevis might be beyond it, due to ground clearance issues, but you’ll certainly make it home when the snow starts falling. The extra weight of the gearbox hits economy slightly, with a meagre 1.4mpg drop compared to the manual version, but the end result is a still an impressive 62.8mpg on the combined cycle. And that doesn’t appear to be an entirely unrealistic figure either, with 50+mpg in normal use being easily achievable while on test. There’s no extra weight on the inside, with disappointingly lightweight plastics making up the bland, but inoffensive dashboard. And with a long list of standard equipment included within the price, there’s not a shortage of space for the driver to enjoy all of the functions. The S-Cross feels light and airy inside, at least up front, but it gets a bit tighter for headroom in the rear. The boot is class competitive, swallowing exactly the same 430 litres of luggage as Nissan’s Qashqai, and is similarly comparable to SsangYong’s new Tivoli. The SX4 S-Cross comes loaded with equipment, offers excellent real-world economy and has the extra traction and reassurance afforded by four-wheeldrive. It might not be the most exciting model in the segment, or even the class leader, but it offers excellent value for money in a generally pleasing package.
  • NORTON FLAT TRACK.

    This modern Norton dirt track custom is the work of Jamie Ireson’s 72Motorcycles, in collaboration with Norton Motorcycles - a tribute to the 1970s RonWood racing machine that won three Ascot track championship titles and was taken to a National dirt track victory by Alex Jorgenson. Based on a newCommando 961, it was recently launched at Motorcycle Live on the official NortonMotorcycles stand as the first of a limited edition run of 12. Ireson said: “The project started whenmy partnerMerryMichau photographed the 2014 Norton brochure. She toldNorton CEO Stuart Garner that I build custombikes and it went from there. Stuart asked us to come up with some ideas and it turned out that we had the same thoughts on building a custombike based on RonWood’s dirt tracker. Ireson is a design engineer by trade and used his experience gained in the automotive industry to model the bike in CAD before committing to metal. “The one thing we needed to do was lower the bike, and working in CAD with models that Norton supplied allowedme to see what effect that had.” That was November 2014 but it took until June 2015 for the project to take off. “Norton sent me a rolling chassis and engine unit with the only stipulation being that the bike had to be ready forMotorcycle Live at the NEC,” says Jamie. The engine and transmission are standard 961, as is the main frame, but Jamie modified the rear end. He says: “The RonWood bike has a really small oil tank, because it’s designed to only do a small number of laps. I cut off the end off the original tank, made up some bends on a CNCmachine and got themwelded up to follow the lines of Ron Wood’s [oil-carrying] frame.” According to Jamie, the standard Norton chassis geometry is slap bang in the middle of what is considered an ideal flat track set-up, but this build had to retain the standard 17in wheels. The swingarm is also standard, but with added bracing. The standard Ohlins forks were too long so Jamie opted for shorter, larger-diameter 58mm Ducati Panigale forks which slot into new yokes made from Jamie’s CAD drawings by Fastec Racing in Suffolk, who also did machining work on footpeg mounts and the velocity stacks. Jamie produced a buck for the tank, from which Parker Fabrication in Bournemouth produced the alloy tank. “The inspiration of the Ron Wood bike was the gorgeous red paintwork and tank graphics. We talked with out painters, Image Design, about giving it a modern twist, but they said it was so good we should leave it. The only change is using the current Norton logo.” The engine is standard, but Jamie’s removed the original airbox, so: “we might pick up anything between five and 10bhp.” The exhaust follows the same lines as the Ron Wood bike. It’s all custom made and hand-rolled by Tom at Foundry Motorcycles. The pipes have been given a super hard-wearing ceramic-coated black by Wes at Hi-Spec Coatings in West Sussex. Lasertech Engineering did all the frame welding. The Norton 961 MM Flat Track is priced at ?30,000. “All 12 will be identical except for the number,” says Jamie. “We’ve got 44. We’re keeping this original bike. Customers can have any number, but we won’t use one number twice.”
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