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Ligier JS11

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Ligier JS11 - information: Ligier JS11 is a very good car, that was released by "Ligier" company. We collected the best 10 photos of Ligier JS11 on this page.

Brand Name Ligier
Model Ligier JS11
Number of views 19526 views
Model's Rate 5.5 out of 10
Number of images 10 images
Interesting News
  • This is Yamaha S10000R.

    YAMAHA ALWAYS SAID there would be larger MTmodels, and that the crossplane-crank inline-four engine fromthe YZF-R1 could be used. Given theMT-07’s twin andMT-09’s triple are ‘crossplane concept’ and called the CP2 andCP3, it would kindamake sense to have an actual crossplanemotor in the range. So here’s the newMT-10. This isn’t just the engine froman R1. Unlike its purposebuilt siblings, and despite promising to be ‘enjoyed on any road, any time and at any speed’, theMT-10 is heavily based on themachine that donates its gravelly, snarling engine. Frame, forks, shock and brakes are nicked fromthe sportsbike (or, to be precise, the slightly lower-spec R1-S that they get in the USA). This is Yamaha’s S1000R. Obviously there are changes. The 998cc engine has different pistons, crank, intake, exhaust and injection for bottom-end balls and midrange might, and revised gearing. Like other MTs there are three ridingmodes, but the MT-10 also has cruise control and threelevel traction. A quickshifter will be optional. The frame has ‘optimised strength/rigidity balance’, with a steel subframe andmodified settings for the suspension, and a stubby 1400mmwheelbase - just 20mm longer than the trim newMT-03. Radial calipers have ABS, and the Bridgestone tyres are specially developed for the bike. You’ll get 17 litres in the tank and there’s a 12v power socket. Colours? Blue, black, or the ‘Night Fluro’ grey with high-vis wheels that’s available across theMT range. Yamaha have trodden this path before. The now-defunct FZ1was based on an R1, but its attitude and revvy delivery made it hard work against rival nakeds of the day. Times change however, and now we’re in the age of the supernaked theMT could be just the job. Yamaha haven’t decided howmuch power or weight to claim, or howmuch it’ll cost. But they do assure us that the new MT-10 will be here in May.
  • Improved Kyalami could host WEC.

    Porsche’s Kyalami Racing Circuit played host to the recent launch of the 991.2 Turbo and C4S (which you can read about beginning on page 20) and, after speaking with officials from the circuit, Total 911 can reveal there are plans in place to return the venue to the very top of the motorsporting calendar. Purchased at an auction in July 2014 by Porsche South Africa CEO and entrepreneur, Toby Venter, a total refurbishment of the facility and track commenced in May 2015, and is set to be finished by the end of May 2016, with a variety of new buildings and upgraded facilities already evident. The fully resurfaced track itself is wider in some areas, with a longer straight, and run-off areas have been greatly improved - all in line with FIA regulations. The track has an illustrious history of races and drivers to its name, including 18 Formula One Grands Prix hosted between 1967 and 1985, while legends such as Jacky Ickx, Alain Prost, Jim Clark, Nigel Mansell and Jackie Stewart have also raced there. Kyalami’s general manager refused to be drawn on speculation linking the circuit with an appearance on the WEC calendar when questioned by Total 911, but did confirm that several manufacturers have already booked the track for days on end towards the latter part of 2016. This is partly the reason why the track won’t be branded as ‘Porsche’, as it will be open for any manufacturer or brand to hire the facility. Once finished, there will also be a skid pan, a 1.1-kilometre handling circuit and an off-road training course. Needless to say, there is a lot more planned for this new world-class facility. Mr Venter is an avid Porsche racer, so we won’t be surprised if he plans to bring WEC and Formula One to South Africa, while journalists driving the circuit at the Turbo launch were impressed by the layout and on-track challenges. It is also quite possible that Porsche AG will conduct hot weather track testing there in the future. Although the company won’t be able to keep its cars away from prying eyes, perfect weather conditions will be present at the venue, which is also one of the highest altitude tracks in the world. Porsche AG has been conducting hot weather tests in South Africa for a number of years now, and having a track in the vicinity to add to its test schedule will be of considerable benefit.
  • MIDSIZE ROLE PLAYER.

    The naked standard motorcycle category appears to have finally taken hold in the US, due in large part to the sales success of Yamaha’s bombshell FZ-09. After Suzuki’s challenge to the Yamaha triple (“Budget Blasters,” October/November 2015), now Kawasaki is jumping into the middleweight standard fray by bringing its Z800 ABS to the US market for 2016. Well, 49 states for now; California residents unfortunately won’t get the bike yet due to the added emissions requirements. Available since 2013 in other markets, the Z800 is powered by a liquidcooled, DOHC, 806cc inline-four that is basically a bored-out, upgraded version of the old Z750 engine. A 2.6mm-larger bore with 10-percent-lighter pistons getting cooled by larger oil jets, revised intake/exhaust ports, longer intake manifolds, and a staggered intake funnel setup along with 2mm-larger throttle bodies (now 34mm) boosts peak horsepower by a claimed 6 hp to a 111 hp peak in European tune (Kawasaki USA wasn’t listing power figures). Longer exhaust header pipes with equalizer tubes between cylinders and an exhaust valve in the under-engine chamber help midrange power. The European press has had plenty of good things to say about the Z800’s engine, and after a day spent riding in the streets of Palm Springs and up in the canyons of the San Jacinto mountain range, we’d heartily agree. There’s plenty of responsive low-end and midrange acceleration, aided in part by the change to a two-teeth-larger rear sprocket. While not quite up to the sprightly FZ-09 as far as overall power in the bottom half of the rev range, the Kawasaki towers over the GSX-S750 when it comes to response from the engine room. Power continues to build as rpm rises into the five-digit zone before tapering off slightly as the Z800’s engine approaches its rev limiter around 12,000 rpm, but there’s enough top-end power to be had without revving it that far, and wheelies are but a clutch-snap away. The Z750’s steel backbone frame was revised with two bolt-on aluminum subframe sections that allow the Z800’s front engine mounts to be positioned behind the cylinders. While Kawasaki says this allows the vibration from the inline-four to be isolated more effectively, some vibes can definitely be felt through the handlebar and footpegs above 7,500 rpm. Nonetheless, the Z800 has a nice, neutral yet fairly agile feel in the corners, with only a little effort required to fl ick the bike into a corner. Line changes in midcorner are easily accomplished with zero drama, and the stock Dunlop OEM-spec D214 Sportmax tires display good grip and light steering characteristics. There’s plenty of ground clearance, and the standard KYB suspension components on the Kawasaki-a 43mm inverted fork (adjustable for spring preload on one side and rebound damping on the other) and single rear shock (also adjustable for spring preload and rebound damping)-provide good wheel and chassis control even when the pace heats up. The ride is a little firm for pothole-ridden urban tarmac and highway superslab but nothing drastic. Despite the budget-looking standard-mount two-piece Nissin calipers, the brakes work well. Response is a little fl at, but power and feel are surprisingly good, with the 310mm discs likely helping by providing good leverage for the calipers. And the standard Nissin ABS works well too, with a fairly high intervention point and transparent action overall. Probably a good thing, as those brakes need to slow down around 509 pounds with a full fuel tank; even though it carries that weight well, the Z800’s heft is our only real gripe with the Kawasaki. Ergos are average standard bike fare, with a slight sporty cant to your upper torso offsetting the windblast. At $8,399, the Kawasaki Z800 ABS is a touch more expensive than the non-ABS-equipped Yamaha FZ-09 ($8,190) or the Suzuki GSX-S750 ($7,999 for the base model). But its solid performance definitely makes it worth a look in the middleweight standard category.
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