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New Flyer D 60 HF

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New Flyer D 60 HF - information: New Flyer D 60 HF is a very good car, that was released by "New Flyer" company. We collected the best 12 photos of New Flyer D 60 HF on this page.

Brand Name New Flyer
Model New Flyer D 60 HF
Number of views 57637 views
Model's Rate 9.7 out of 10
Number of images 12 images
Interesting News
  • NEW 2016 KAWASAKI ZX-10R.

    With World Superbike regulations becoming ever stricter with regard to modifications, manufacturers have to make sure their production models already have the proper pieces in place. And after winning two World Superbike championships in the past three years, Kawasaki shows that it’s serious about staying at the top of the superbike heap with its all-new 2016 ZX-10R. All of the extensive updates to Team Green’s new literbike were gleaned from lessons learned in WSBK competition and intended to make sure the factory team has a solid base to start from for the coming season. Engine Other than the previous engine’s bore and stroke, there’s little carried over between the old and new ZX-10R. The new crankshaft is lighter for quicker response and improved handling, with a correspondingly lighter balance shaft and rod journals that have a new coating for reduced friction at higher rpm. New 5-gram-lighter pistons, cams with more overlap, and a new airbox (25 percent more volume and air filter with 60 percent more surface area for better fl ow) work with an all-new cylinder head featuring reworked and polished intake and exhaust ports (previously only the intake ports were polished) plus revised combustion chambers. The titanium exhaust valves increase in size 1mm to 25.5mm, and cylinder-wall thickness was increased slightly for a more rigid engine block. The titanium alloy headers use a new heat-resistant alloy that allows thinner wall thickness for reduced weight, and the titanium exhaust canister has 50 percent more volume for better fl ow without increased sound levels. The intake portion of the frame’s steering head was modified to quell intake honk, allowing some freedom in the exhaust for more power without exceeding strict noise restrictions. The transmission remains a racing-style cassette design for quick and easy internal gearing changes. Gear ratios are closer for track use, with shorter ratios in all but first gear. The slipper clutch is 130 grams lighter, and some of the gears have dry-film lubricant coating to reduce friction. A contactless- sensor-equipped quickshifter similar to the H2R is standard, with the optional Kawasaki race ECU offering clutchless downshifts as well. Electronics The new ZX-10R utilizes a Bosch five-axis IMU with software developed in-house at Kawasaki that allows the unit to calculate yaw rate from other sensors, resulting in six-axis operation. This allows the IMU to sense changes in pavement elevation, camber, and the motorcycle’s position relative to them, as well as discern different tire profiles so that the bike is not restricted to just the OEM tires. The Sport-Kawasaki TRaction Control (S-KTRC) system now has five modes of operation instead of three as with the previous ZX-10R. Modes 1 and 2 are designed for racing, while mode 3 is for a “dry circuit with highgrip tires,” mode 4 is for “dry canyon roads or commuting,” and mode 5 is intended for wet pavement use. The Keihin 47mm throttle bodies utilize an electronic ride-by-wire throttle system to control power in addition to ignition retardation. With the Bosch IMU, Kawasaki was able to produce its own version of the cornering ABS that has seen usage on KTM and BMW motorcycles. Kawasaki’s system is called Cornering Management Function and changes braking pressure according to the bike’s lean and pitch angles to prevent it from standing up under braking in a corner. Another new addition is the Kawasaki Launch Control Mode (KLCM), with three modes available. And Kawasaki Engine Braking Control-first seen on the supercharged H2R-manages engine back-torque. Lastly, there are three selectable power modes for the new ZX-10R: Full, Middle (providing approximately 80 percent power), or Low (allowing 60 percent power). Chassis The new Ninja’s frame has also been redone, with the steering head moved rearward 7.5mm closer to the rider, while the swingarm has been lengthened 15.8mm (in addition to extra bracing for more torsional rigidity), resulting in more front weight bias. Wheelbase is now listed as 56.7 inches, almost a half inch longer than its predecessor. An all-new Showa Balance Free Fork featuring an external damping valve chamber utilizes a design similar to the ?hlins TTX/FGR concept, with the rebound and compression damping valves completely separated so that the oil only flows in one direction through the valves; in conjunction with nitrogen pressurization in the damping chamber, this keeps the pressure on both sides of the valves as consistent as possible, drastically reducing cavitation that results in inconsistent damping. The rear Showa Balance Free Rear Cushion (BFRC) shock uses the same concept in its damping valves, and the shock linkage has been revised to allow a broader range of adjustment. Brakes have also been fully upgraded, with Brembo M50 monoblock aluminum calipers with 30mm pistons biting on huge 330mm discs for awesome stopping power. A Brembo radial-action master cylinder equipped with steel-braided brake lines ensures positive and responsive feel at the lever as well as better consistency. Wheels are one of the few components that haven’t been changed, though they are now shod with Bridgestone RS10 street/track rubber in 120/70-17 front and 190/55-17 rear sizes. Bodywork has undergone some restyling, with the windscreen improved for better aerodynamics. Overall weight is claimed at 450 pounds wet with all fluids and a full tank of fuel for the non-ABS model, 454 pounds wet for the ABS model. List prices are $14,999 for the standard ZX-10R, $15,299 for the Special Edition paint, $15,999 for the ZX-10R ABS model, and $16,299 for the ZX-10R ABS with Special Edition paint scheme. How will all of these changes affect Kawasaki’s performance in World Superbike and on the showroom floor? We can’t wait to find out.
  • Jaguar XJ.

    It’s fair to say that the new Jaguar XE and XF have been soaking up most of the coverage about Jaguar of late, not to mention the upcoming F-Pace, set to arrive in showrooms next year. And then there’s been the Bond connection, with 007 behind the wheel of the stunning C-X75 supercar, which though once mooted for production, won’t now be built. With so much going on, it’s little surprise that the announcement of a revised XJ fell below the radar, with the first examples arriving in showrooms just about now. It’s remarkable to think that the F-Type is now Jaguar’s oldest car in its line-up, having only been launched in 2012, and arriving in showrooms during 2013. It’s a far cry from Jaguar’s line-up just a few years ago when most of the models seemed quite elderly. It’s been the hefty cash injection from Jaguar’s owners, Tata Motors, that has made the difference, ever since it bought the firm alongside Land Rover back in 2008. In excess of Ј11 billion has been invested over the past seven years, which has resulted in the transformation that we see today. And while Jaguar’s sales performance hasn’t quite lived up to the spectacular results that the Land Rover range has seen, last month’s increase in sales of 93 per cent compared to a year ago is predicted to be just the start. Much of Jaguar’s hopes are being pinned on the upcoming F-Pace crossover vehicle, though this updated XJ is set to make a small, but significant contribution thanks to important gains in the chauffeur market. Jaguar executives have been wooing big names in the professional end of the market, and it’ll mean that you’ll see more long- wheelbase XJs on the outside of the motorway instead of the Mercedes-Benz S-Class. The headline change in the latest XJ, apart from some modest styling changes, is the introduction of a new Euro-6 compliant 3.0- litre V6 diesel engine that develops 296bhp and a mighty 516lb ft of torque. That’s a rather useful 25bhp up on the outgoing model, not to mention the 73lb ft of torque. And yet, both CO2 emissions and fuel economy figures are improved over the previous edition, with this standard wheelbase R-Sport edition emitting 155g/km of CO2 and capable of 47.9mpg on the combined cycle. Less sporty editions manage 149g/km and 49.6mpg, an enhancement compared to the 159g/km and 46.3mpg possible on the earlier model. And this time around there’s no penalty for choosing the long-wheelbase edition, with fuel economy and CO2 emissions remaining the same. But with the vital statistics out of the way, it’s time to talk about some of the changes made to the car. New full-LED lights give the latest XJ a more distinctive quad-lighting signature at night, while a prominent, upright front grille gives a much more muscular, imposing stance. At the rear, LED technology is used to great effect to deliver a J-shape signature for the tail lights, flanked by revised bumpers, a gloss black valence and a chrome insert. A totally new, superfast infotainment system totally transforms the connectivity of the latest XJ, finally putting to rest the limitations and clunkiness of the old audio and navigation system. And finally, the model range has been revised to add a dynamic R-Sport edition, as tested here, as well as a flagship Autobiography model paired to the long-wheelbase body that elevates the XJ range past the Ј80k barrier. The cabin of the latest XJ is as special as ever. The materials are sumptuous, swathed in leather, and the wrap-around effect of the dashboard delivers a cosy, encapsulating feel. Piano black surfaces deliver a modern, sporty look, while the heavily bolstered chairs hold you in place nicely along demanding stretches of road. The air vents wouldn’t be out of place in a Rolls-Royce, giving the impression that nothing has been spared in the search for ultimate luxury. Generous adjustment to the front chairs means that you can get a really comfortable driving position, though the front seats don’t go low enough to stop the heads of taller drivers from brushing the headlining when the optional sunroof is fitted. Move to the back, and there’s a generous amount of knee and leg space and rear passengers don’t seem to suffer from headroom limitations like those in the front do. The sizeable transmission tunnel running through the centre of the car means that the XJ is best suited to two passengers sat in the back. In common with the XF, there’s theatrics in store when the car is started up, with the rotary gear selector rising up from the centre console. It’s a feature that you never tire of and adds to the special feel that every XJ delivers. Accelerate off the line and the latest 296bhp 3.0-litre V6 diesel engine catapults you along the road faster than its predecessor. It may only be 0.2 of a second faster to 62mph, but responsiveness is improved nonetheless, no doubt helped by the extra torque on tap. It’s impressively refined at all speeds, yet delivers a pleasing growl when you bury the accelerator pedal into the bulkhead. Despite being more than five metres long, agility through tricky corners is impressive, with excellent grip and reassuringly flat handling. The steering has a pleasing weight to it, and is highly satisfying when being piloted through a challenging set of bends. It’s really good fun for such a big car, yet is utterly manoeuvrable in a city setting. The suspension of this R-Sport model errs on the firm side, no doubt, and will appeal to owners that prefer a more dynamic driving experience. A short drive of the Autobiography model rounded off the sharper edges nicely, delivering a smoother ride at all road speeds.
  • RC 390.

    If you thought the RC 390 was a great bike to own and ride, well, guess what, it becomes even better now. KTM have ditched that underbelly exhaust for a more conventionally mounted end can on the right and have added ride-by-wire technology to help refine the delivery of the 44 PS from the bike’s liquid-cooled 373-cc single-cylinder engine. A slipper clutch has also been thrown in to reduce wheel chatter during trail braking or aggressive downshifting. All of these additions also mean that for the first time the KTM RC 390 is now Euro 4 compliant. Expect these changes to come into the 390 Duke as well.
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