World Encyclopedia of Cars
The best old cars, news and reviews about old cars. Stay in touch!

Shanghai-Volkswagen Polo

All Shanghai-Volkswagen Photos

Shanghai-Volkswagen Polo - information: Shanghai-Volkswagen Polo is a very good car, that was released by "Shanghai-Volkswagen" company. We collected the best 11 photos of Shanghai-Volkswagen Polo on this page.

Brand Name Shanghai-Volkswagen
Model Shanghai-Volkswagen Polo
Number of views 71075 views
Model's Rate 8.8 out of 10
Number of images 11 images
Interesting News
  • Nissan NP300 Navara.

    Pickups are at the brawny end of the car scene, utility vehicles that used to have a rough and ready image, and the structure and driving characteristics to match. In recent times they have become a lot more civilised, with big advances in creature comfort and road-going behaviour. The latest of the breed, Nissan’s new NP300 Navara - the NP stands for Nissan Pickup - is a very good example of how far down that road pickups have progressed. It is a big vehicle at five and a half metres long, and its elevated chassis means that you still need to be a tall, strong bloke to enter the cab with ease: it’s rather a physical upward haul for those of us more vertically challenged. But once installed it’s something of a revelation. All the controls are pleasantly weighted and you don’t need beefy muscles to drive this latest generation of Navara. It has undergone a mechanical transformation, with the rather rustic leafspring suspension of the previous model now replaced by more sophisticated coil springs, while the previous 2.5-litre dCi engine has been superseded by a more efficient 2.3-litre dCi unit with either 161 or 188bhp power outputs. Both changes bring big benefits. The new Navara has taut and tidy handling, but without undue body lean, and it also rides impressively well with some of the most cushioned comfort of any of the current crop of modern pickups. Strong performance doesn’t come with a noise penalty, and refinement is very good indeed for a vehicle of this type. Gearbox choice is six-speed manual or a seven-speed automatic transmission, and both have well-spaced ratios and a slick action. There are two body styles, the King Cab that is popular in some other markets, with shorter, rear-opening back doors and a basic bench back seat, and the Double Cab that is generally preferred here in the UK and has four full-size conventional doors and fully comfortable back seats. There is nothing rustic about interior comfort, it is on a par with a well-appointed five-seater family hatchback. It’s amply spacious and not cramped. Cabin quality has taken a quantum leap forward over the old model, with tactile materials, an elegantly styled dashboard layout and a level of fit and finish that would not disgrace a prestige-nudging saloon. Large door pockets, some well-placed central cubbyholes and a handy dashboard-top tray means there are enough places to put all your on-the-move oddments. There are five grades of trim, starting with Visia and rising through Acenta, Acenta+, N-Connecta and topping out with Tekna. All versions come with a fair level of standard kit, including Bluetooth mobile phone connectivity, electric windows, cruise control, automatic headlights, electric door mirrors, LED rear lights, and air conditioning on all four-wheel-drive models. Move up the range to Acenta trim and 16-inch alloy wheels are fitted, as well as keyless entry and start and chrome embellishments. Acenta+ versions feature 18-inch alloy wheels, climate control, rear privacy glass, reversing camera, front fog lights, leather steering wheel and gearknob, as well as heated door mirrors with power folding. In N-Connecta trim, as tested, a seven-inch touchscreen navigation system is included, and there’s DAB digital radio and Bluetooth audio streaming, while choosing Tekna versions includes leather upholstery, roof rails, LED headlights and daytime running lights, rear parking sensors, a 360 degree camera system and heated and electric driver’s seat. A rear differential lock is optional on all models except the entrylevel Visia trim, while an electric sunroof is available on Tekna versions at extra cost. The new NP300 Navara shows how far pickups have come in recent years. From the outside this is still a large, beefy workhorse, albeit one with sleeker curves than before. From the inside, and in its driving manners, you could think yourself at the wheel of an upper-crust SUV. Nissan has done a good job of significantly upping its game with this one.
  • SsangYong Turismo.

    Most of the column inches about SsangYong have been concerning its brand new baby crossover, the Tivoli, a newcomer that has contributed to a doubling of sales during 2015. But in the background, away from the headlines, the Korean firm has been busy updating some of the older members of the line-up, too, with the introduction of a brand-new Euro-6 emissions compliant 2.2-litre diesel engine in the Korando, Rexton and Turismo. Here we test it in SsangYong’s gargantuan MPV, which last year received a general spruce up. Our test car is the flagship of the line-up, the fourwheel- drive ELX paired to a new sevenspeed Mercedes-Benz-sourced sevenspeed automatic transmission, which at Ј24,995, including the fantastic five-year limitless warranty, is an absolute bargain. The Turismo dwarfs any other car that it parks alongside. Its sheer bulk translates into a massive amount of space, with the cabin configured in a two-two-three seating arrangement, with generous space for seven occupants to spread out in all directions. The rear bench seat slides fore and aft, and there’s also sufficient room for luggage for all passengers, too, which is a rarity in this segment. The design of the cabin has fallen behind the latest trends, and the large centrally mounted dials can be difficult to read in poor light. There’s a mixture of both soft and hard surfaces, and an overriding feeling of solidity, though it all looks just a little bit dated. The instruments ahead of the driver look like a 1980s computer game, for instance. You’re sat up high in a command-like position, and allround visibility is excellent thanks to large, deep windows. The seats are comfortable enough, though they do lack lateral support when cornering. Storage space is well thought out, with drinks holders in the door pockets, a deep armrest and a decent area in front of the gear lever. And you can tell from the double coin holders that SsangYong’s got the Turismo’s market clearly defined, and that’s as a taxi. Despite its weight, the 2.2-litre Turismo is surprisingly sprightly off the line. The engine is quiet and never sounds strained, no matter how many revs you pile on. Developing 176bhp and 295lb ft of torque, there’s 15 per cent more power, and torque is up 11 per cent compared to the outgoing engine. The foot operated park brake is outdated, and despite the seven-speed automatic transmission being new, there are occasions when it is slow to change gear. While it’s certainly not the most agile car to drive, in view of its numb steering, it’s pleasing that there’s an almost total absence of body roll when cornering. Grip levels on account of the standard four-wheel-drive system are high, and the suspension delivers a floaty experience that seems adept at soaking up the worst of the lumps and bumps that are present on the UK’s roads. Finally, with a two-tonne towing capacity, this all-wheel-drive MPV should shrug off hauling a large caravan or motorboat with ease.
  • CUSHIONING THE RIDE.

    Citroen and Britain go back a long way. Early Citroens were first sold here just after the first World War, from 1919. They quickly endeared themselves to UK drivers, and by 1923 there were already over 23,000 of the cars on British roads. Then, for almost 40 years, from 1926 until 1965, British-made Citroens were produced in a factory in Slough. We Brits are still major consumers of Citroen products, as the third largest market in the world for the cars, behind only China, and Citroen’s native France. There is another very strong Anglo-French link. For the past 18 months, Citroen’s global boss has been a British chief executive, who also happens to be one of the most senior women in the motor industry worldwide. Linda Jackson, former managing director of Citroen UK, runs the company from its Paris base and is shaping its future with some radical plans. Briefly back in Britain on a day trip via Eurostar, she revealed her strategy for driving the company forward and restoring some of its past glory. This is, after all, the brand with some very notable models in its 96-year history, such as the pioneering Traction Avant, the unforgettable 2CV, and the remarkable Ami 6. Citroens used to be known for their quirkiness, a characteristic that had evaporated in a couple of generations of rather bland models, but has recently been revived in the much more characterful Citroen C4 Cactus, with its distinctive body-protecting airbumps. Initial plans to build 70,000 units a year has proved overly modest, and current C4 Cactus production is running at 110,000 per annum. So can we expect more of the same in future models? Yes, says Linda Jackson. Although it is hard to quantify within a largely French-speaking company, as there is no direct translation in French for the word quirky. “The success of the C4 Cactus shows you can have a vehicle that stands out and be successful with it,” comments Linda. “We have never been successful when we try to be like everyone else. It’s a gamble to be quirky, but it’s what we are doing.” Something else for which Citroen has traditionally been known is the magic carpet ride quality of its famed hydropneumatic suspension, although more recently a hydraulic system on the current C5 has sought to deliver a modern version of cushioning ride comfort. But now Citroen is on the brink of revealing a revolutionary new suspension system that Linda says will be exclusive to the French firm, and will eventually become standard right across the range. It will appear on the first new model in 2017. For the moment she is a bit cagey about the specifics, whether it will be a self-levelling design, or some kind of air suspension system, but she promises it will take Citroen back to its roots of admirable ‘floating’ ride comfort, while maintaining good body control for handling precision. “Comfort is a core value of the Citroen brand, and this is our way to recreate the benefits of the hydropneumatic set-up in a more modern, more appropriate way,” she told us. Meanwhile, she is busy with bold plans to slim the Citroen range from its current 14 different body styles to a more rational seven core designs based around three platforms. It’s intended to make the brand both leaner and fitter, and also better structured for customers to appreciate what Citroen is about. So how does a British boss go down in an iconic French company? Pretty well so far. A clear direction and plans to resurrect some of what made past Citroens special is winning her respect. They’re even quite kind about her A-level-based ability to speak French. “They say I have an accent like Jane Birkin,” says an amused Linda.
Top Shanghai-Volkswagen models
Popular Searches
World Encyclopedia of Cars
Copyright 2017. All rights under protection.