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Terrot 125 Tournoi

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Terrot 125 Tournoi - information: Terrot 125 Tournoi is a very good car, that was released by "Terrot" company. We collected the best 11 photos of Terrot 125 Tournoi on this page.

Brand Name Terrot
Model Terrot 125 Tournoi
Number of views 113024 views
Model's Rate 7.6 out of 10
Number of images 11 images
Interesting News
  • Kia Optima.

    Anyone asked to pen an obituary for the outgoing Kia Optima would probably write something like "nice-looking car; shame about the CO2 emissions, refinement and trim quality". Which is pretty much what customers said, and a good starting point for Kia when getting down to work on the new one. But that's not all. For a while, Kia has been dragging its feet in the areas of connectivity and advanced driver assistance features. Both of those have also been addressed. And there will be greater choice, with sportier-looking GT-Line versions for the first time. The Optima's good looks have been further polished, and there's more passenger and cargo room thanks to a longer wheelbase, higher roof line and wider cockpit. For now, the UK line-up will again be diesel only, though a plug-in hybrid will be added in 2016. The diesel engine is a Euro-6 emissions compliant version of the 1.7-litre CRDi unit from the previous Optima, developing more power (139bhp instead of 134) and extra torque (251lb ft versus 240). Maximum torque arrives earlier in the rev band, too - at 1,750rpm rather than 2,000. Vitally, it also produces lower emissions - down by 14 per cent to 110g/km for the six-speed manual gearbox, and by a massive 27 per cent to 116g/km with the seven-speed twin-clutch automatic transmission, which replaces the former six-speed torque converter unit. That lowers the tax burden on company car users by three and eight bands respectively. And if that's not enough, Kia is promising greater refinement, a smoother ride and a more engaging drive. Those promises have largely been kept. It takes only a few hundred yards to appreciate the improved driveability of the revised engine (just follow the guidance of the gearshift indicator to see how much more driverfriendly it is) and its greater smoothness and more dulcet tones. With the new automatic gearbox, it's even better, and given that it raises benefit-in-kind tax by only one band over than the manual car, Kia can envisage a fair take-up. There's less wind noise (no gaps in the door seals any more, and better windscreen mountings), although the claimed improvements in road noise are surfacedependent. The same can be said for the ride, though the heavily revised suspension mostly does its job well. A relocated power steering pump makes the car a bit more adroit, too. The real joy for business users who might have to spend hours behind the wheel, however, will come from the plusher interior, more shapely seats (though the cushions might be just a bit too hard for some after a while) and more premium equipment options. A TomTom equipped navigation system with connected services will be standard, through a seven-inch screen with impressively clear graphics set at exactly the same height as the instruments. The pared-down switchgear is set lower in a horizontally orientated dash, and looks very BMW reminiscent. All versions of the Optima feature a reversing camera, dual-zone climate control, cruise control, speed limiter, power folding and heated mirrors, DAB digital radio and Bluetooth connectivity, as well as 17-inch alloy wheels, LED daytime running lights, tyre pressure monitors, and electric hand brake and hill start assist. Move up to level 3 and you get a larger eight-inch navigation screen, electric driver’s seat, heated front chairs, xenon headlights and 18-inch alloy wheels, as well as extra chrome for the exterior, half leather seats, an uprated instrument cluster, a Harmon Kardon premium sound system and LED front fog lights and rear tail light clusters. Right at the top-of-the-range, the new level 4 equipment level includes wireless mobile phone charging, a 360- degree camera system, automated parking, blind spot detection, rear cross traffic alert, a lane keeping assistant, as well as high beam assist, speed limit detection, autonomous emergency braking and adaptive cruise control. Leather upholstery is also included within the price tag, as well as ventilated front seats and heated rear outer chairs, and a panoramic glass sunroof. GT-Line versions will fall somewhere in the middle, with final specifications to be confirmed when it is launched later in 2016.
  • MITSUBISHI OUTLANDER PHEV 2.0 MIVEC GX4h.

    Bandwagons have rarely looked as tasty as this. Mitsubishi’s first PHEV (plug-in hybrid electric vehicle) looked like a confused fish, but now it has design bite and a sparkle in its LED eyes. If it means business, it brings a market report that makes irresistible reading: in the last 12 months, around 39,000 hybrid cars have sold in the UK, a rise of around 7,000 on the previous year. And this is the star of that sales storm, Britain’s number one plug-in hybrid. Not that I initially felt turned on. My car was delivered by an expert called Dave. I gave him a lift to the railway station, but by the time we’d got to the drop-off bay, I began to wish he’d stay. After all, the boot’s quite roomy, even with all those batteries aboard. It wasn’t that Dave was great company (though if you’re reading this, Dave, it was nice to meet you), but just more that the initial prospect of a gear-free gizmo with steering paddles that effectively operate braking, with buttons that allow you to bank energy options, and with more than a Maplin’s worth of electrical socketry… well, let’s just say that as I drove off, I wondered if the handbrake might also cunningly adjust the fridge back at home. I certainly knew how Laika must have felt when those Russians packed her off in Sputnik 2: forget range anxiety, I needed to conquer technology terror first. But unlike a doomed dog I soon began to relax. Within two days, I was a first-class ecoheaded guru, mentally kerchinging full-on B5 regeneration mode on a 1:10 slope, tutting knowingly at the elastic nature of what is forecast to be a mile of battery juice (in the Outer Cotswolds, it can be mere furlongs) and laughing sarcastically at the difference between a functioning charge point and the sort supermarkets brag about (thanks, Sainsbury’s) which, when driven to, “don’t work and never have, mate, not since it was installed on day one’. Mitsubishi won’t tell you, but this car also comes with an anorak as standard. You think you'll not need it, but you’ll soon be zipped in snugly. The reason? E-driving is addictive. Think about it: rationally, it’s the last avenue of motoring pleasure open to any sane driver out there. Drive wisely, zap regularly (from home at about 50p a pop) and a brave new world of fiscal freedom beckons. Before you know it, you’re a moth to that elusive candle of perpetual motion. Be warned though: egg-shell throttling and B5-level regeneration spells inordinate use of the brake lights, which now kick in because, as Dave told me, regeneration has the same net effect as steady braking. Could this spell expensive dentistry for BMW drivers, I ask Dave. We agreed that, all told, we must make sure that the planet comes first. Shunt stress aside, the PHEV soon proves to be as much fun with batteries as anything roadgoing. For me, at least. Five hundred miles in, I show my wife we’re achieving the kind of mpg fossil fuellists can only dream about. Yes, she says, but driving at 29mph might not always be practical. And those other drivers… maybe that’s not friendly waving? She takes the car to work though, and while I haven’t monitored her journey GCHQstyle (it may well be a Bluetooth option), I snoop on her data and see she’s been wearing that anorak as well. Not that the PHEV’s incapable of driving like you forgot to turn the chip pan off. In a few hundred yards of thoughtless abandon, I floored it to see how it liked a bit of action. It was, as they say, up for it, though that two tonnes of bodyweight did make me think of a Labrador suffering from greyhound delusions. Still, I’m not sure Mitsubishi’s seeking product placement in the next Bond movie, so maybe it's a moot point. A snap verdict? I love it. It’s early days, but my PHEV’s got my expectations on maximum charge.
  • Modern throwback.

    This is the XSR900. And yes, you’re right - it’s the charismatic three-cylinder MT-09 wearing it’s dad’s flares and floppy-collared shirt. Chassis and engine are MT-09, with the 2016 updates of a slipper-assist light-action clutch and three-level traction control. For the XSR the MT’s contemporary styling is swapped for round lights, aluminium bodywork and round instruments. ‘To reflect Yamaha’s sporty DNA, its history and its iconic motorcycles of the past,’ they say. Hmm. Don’t know about all that, but the 900 pulls it off. You could predict the XSR. After retrofying the MT-07 into the XSR700 (see last issue) this larger ‘Faster Sons’ variant was a given, especially after Yamaha’s video of the ‘Faster Wasp’ MT-09 flattracker by US custom bloke Roland Sands. Let’s hope the trim on the front of his tank makes the accessory list, to give the same flat-tank profile. In other MT-related news, there’s now an MT-03. Basically a naked YZF-R3 sportsbike for A2 licence holders, with funky digi dash, LED lights and crisp lines, it’s not quite a modern LC... but looks good.
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